Is My Lawn Dead Because it is Brown?

Pressure Washing Can Make All the Difference in the World!
February 23, 2018
Peat Moss
What is Peat Moss and How Will It Help My Lawn?
March 12, 2018

There is a misconception that if you have a brown lawn, your lawn is dead. Are you one of those many homeowners who think the same way? This post will answer the question and provide you more information that you need to know about the condition of your lawn.

Two relevant terms that you should know first are dormancy and damage. If your lawn turns into brown is it damaged or only dormant which you can quickly revive when proper attention is given. Your yard may turn brown during dry weather, and it is due to lack of rain, but it is not dead, only dormant. It may look dead to the naked eye, but if you check the plant’s crown, you will find out it is still alive. As soon as the top gets enough moisture again, it will turn back to green within 10-14 days.

How to Distinguish a Dormant From Damaged Lawn?

Did you know that lawn can become dormant for one month without having any harmful effects? If the dry season continues for an extended period, the loss will be around 25%. The essential thing you need to remember when lawns are dormant is to keep feet off the grass. If there is a lot of traffic in your yard while in an inactive state, it may lead to severe damage.

When you notice some hairy chinch bugs on your lawn, it means your brown lawn is coming back. You will see these hairy chinch bugs in the late July. One visible sign these bugs are present is the small sunken spots of the brown area in your green lawn.

If, after summer season your lawn does not return to its green color within 10 to 14 days, it is possible your yard is destroyed either by drought or chinch bugs. To revive your lawn, you can overseed the area during fall.

The Verdict

So, to answer the question ” is my lawn dead because it is brown?”, the answer is not all the time. As described above, some grass turns to brown because of lack of rain and drought, but it does not necessarily mean that it is dead or damaged. After the summer season, and if there is moisture left in your lawn it will regain its color within 10 to 14 days. Checking your lawn before you decide it is dead could save you money and time. Reseeding or re-sodding is much easier and cost effective than replacing your grass.